Church on the Hill Early Members

169 Main St., Church on the Hill - 1805
169 Main St., Church on the Hill – 1805

The current beautiful Church on the Hill building was dedicated in 1806, replacing an earlier meeting house.  In 1906 a centennial celebration was held and the Hon. Francis W. Rockwell described the men who had been members of the congregation up to 1806.

Early Members Recognized in Dedication Centennial

At the time of the dedication of the new building in 1806 there had been 205 members, 89 men.  Many of them were active in early town business and records suggest 61 of the early members were living in 1806.  Nineteen or more were in Lenox in 1774 and signed the Non-Importation Agreement.  At least 15 served in the militia active in the defense of Boston and the Battle of Saratoga.  The initial members and the information available on them(from Centennial Anniversary of the Dedication of the Old Church on the Hill) in the Church Centennial history follow.  The tidbits of information paint a picture of a patriotic, peripatetic and ambitious town founders.

  1. David Allen lived near the River Lot 19, First Division.
  2. William Andrus sold 50 acres on Williams’ Grant east of Stockbridge in 1774 (west part of Lenox).
  3. Jacob Bacon, who was thought to have moved early on to Lanesborough,  was said to have been the first person to clear land in the north part of town (“on a hill west of the county road”).
  4. Joseph Baker was admitted to the church in 1784.
  5. Elisha Bangs* was in the army and was an ancestry of the Bangs family – numerous in Lenox at the time of the Centennial.
  6. Thomas Bateman* served in the army and moved to Vermont in 1798. He lived near Russell Hines near New Lenox.
  7. Thomas Benedict* was in the army.
  8. Amos Benton* left Lenox in 1793.
  9. David Bosworth, Jr. was admitted to the church in 1794.
  10. David Justus Chapin’s house burned in 1803 killing two of his children.
  11. Deacon Elisha Coan lived just over the line in Stockbridge.
  12. Jacob Coan was admitted to the church in 1773.
  13. Lemuel Collins* (lived in the west part of town) was the father of Dr. Daniel Collins and some of the Beldens.  Under the pre-US Royal government he was a lieutenant in the Berkshire militia in 1771.
  14. Oliver Collins lived in Lee and Stockbridge.
  15. Josiah Curtis (James Porter & Co.)
  16. Thomas S. Curtis was with James Porter & Co. (saw mill on the Housatonic in Lee) and lived on the George Munson farm opposite the Bartlett Farm.
  17. Zephaniah Davis came from Hebron, CT and bought land in Lenox in 1803.
  18. Zephaniah Davis, Jr. bought 80 acres in 1806 on the north of the highway leading from the meeting house to East Street.
  19. Joseph Denham lived on the highway from the meeting house to East Street on the north side.
  20. Edmond Dewey lived on what was known in 1906 as the Mahanna Farm.
  21. Jacob Ellis was admitted to the church in 1799.
  22. Daniel Fellows lived near and north of the Meeting House (COH).
  23. Nathan Foot was admitted to the church in 1772.
  24. Ichabod Ford, Jr. lived on the road leading from the county road to Lenox Furnace near Patrick Plunkett.
  25. Jonathan Foster came from Wallingford, CT and was a lieutenant in the army. He and Samuel Foster lived on the Pittsfield Rd.
  26. Allen Goodrich* came from Pittsfield, served in the war and moved to New York state.
  27. Samuel Goodrich* was a merchant in 1773-74 and was a licensed inn-holder in 1781-82 and was in the Revolutionary War as a lieutenant and captain in the militia.
  28. John Gray*, son of Capt. Edward Gray* moved to Dorset, VT where he died in 1817.
  29. James Guthrie* lived near what was, in 1906, the Delafield Farm, was in the war and became a Universalist (horrors).
  30. Isaac Hamlin came from Sharon, CT and was an ancestor of Chauncey Sears.
  31. William Handy was admitted to the church in 1793.
  32. Jonathan Hinsdale* – thought to be first settler in Lenox
  33. Gordon Hollister* lived in the northwest part of town.
  34. Deacon Gordon Hollister, Jr. lived on Stock Street and married a daughter of Enos Stone.
  35. Enoch Hoskins (Haskins) was also a soldier.
  36. Zadock Hubbard owned part of Bartlett Farm (East St.) and built the rear of the house about 1800.
  37. Deacon Nathan Isbell lived in the East St. house built in 1798 by his father as of Noah’s death in 1801.  He furnished a room in the second story called “the lecture room,” which was used for neighborhood prayer meetings.
  38. Noah Isbell, came from Salisbury CT in 1770 and was an ancestor of Deacon Isbell.  He lived on the corner of what is now East and Housatonic Streets on land owned in 1906 by F. Augustus Schmerhorn.  Noah first built a log house and in 1798 built the house where Samuel Howes lived at one time.  At the time of its construction, it was one of the largest and best houses on East. St.
  39. John Ives lived on the road from the meeting house to Rev. Samuel Munson’s (modern day Main St.? modern day Cliffwood?)
  40. Uriah Judd came from Pittsfield and was the grandfather of George U. Judd.
  41. Daniel Keeler* came from Ridgefield, CT in 1773, lived on East Street and moved to Manlius, NY in about 1790.
  42. Lot Keeler and his wife are noted as dismissed in 1795; not record of their admission.
  43. Olin Landers was admitted in 1786.
  44. Thomas Landers* was one of the first settlers coming from Kent, CT to Stockbridge.  He was a short time in the army and lived near Lenox Dale. (described in 1906 as south of the Sedgwick School House?)
  45. Josiah Lee, whose daughter married Major General John Patterson*, came from New Britain, CT and later moved to New York state.
  46. Dr. Eldad Lewis, a surgeon in the army, was in Lenox by 1776.  He published the first Lenox newspaper (“The Lenox Watch Light,”), drew the earliest map we have of Lenox (1792), gave a eulogy on Washington  in 1800 (he was a strong federalist), and wrote a hymn for the new church building dedication.  He lived on Cliffwood St.
  47. Andrew Loomis lived on the Shattuck property on the old road which ran westerly.
  48. William Lusk came from Wethersfield in 1767 to Richmond and Stockbridge.
  49. Edward Martindale lived in the northwest part of town.
  50. Deacon Charles Mattoon* came from Waterbury, CT in 1768 and served in the Revolutionary war.
  51. Joseph Merwin, in 1775, sold 25 acres in lot 18 in the 2nd division to Stephen Merwin.
  52. Peter B. Messenger was admitted to the church in 1786.
  53. Allen Metcalf lived on Bartlett Farm (East St.) and built the front part of the Bartlett House.  He had “The Coffee House” for a time
  54. Josiah Newell lived on the Bourne Farm.
  55. Abraham Northrup* died in 1798.
  56. Job Northrup lived near Scott’s Pond.
  57. David Osborn was a clockmaker and lived in the village.
  58. Rev. Jeremiah Osborn was pastor in the states of New York and Ohio from 1806 to 1839.
  59. Josiah Osborn was, in 1807, associated with the James Porter & Co. saw mill on the Housatonic River in Lee.
  60. Elisha Perkins sold land in Stockbridge in 1779.
  61. Eldad Post came to Lenox in 1803.  A prominent man, he was the father of the Hon. Thomas Post.
  62. James Richards* was in Lenox as early as 1764 (and is noted as living in the village), was buried in his farm (smallpox) in 1777. He is also described as living on the road west of Cliffwood St.
  63. John Robinson was first at Stockbridge, then in Lenox living near the Furnace.
  64. Thomas Rockwell, son-in-law of John Whitlock, bought John Whitlock’s coffee house in 1790 and sold it in 1793. He first settled on what, in 1906, was known as the Bartlett Farm on East St.
  65. Joseph Rogers had two acres on East Street next to Philip Sears and Titus Parker* above Yokun Brook.
  66. Issac Sears, born about 1765 lived on East Street and  bought the hotel property from Enos Blossom in 1799 and sold it in 1802.  His wife died in Lenox in 1799.
  67. Issac Smith lived in a northeast part of Stockbridge that came over the Lenox line.
  68. Jonathan Smith and his wife Rebecca were admitted by letter from Ashfield in 1799.  They are marked as dismissed in 1811 to join certain members of the church at Lee who were about to remove to Ohio. (Another Jonathan Smith is shown as admitted in 1803; both are recorded as dismissed in 1811.)
  69. Amos Stanley* came from West Hartford, CT about 1765, was an ancestor of John and Orrilla Stanley, was one of the first selectmen, was a deacon in the church as of 1785 and died in 1811.
  70. Thomas Steel* came to Lenox about 1767 and settled near Jacob Bacon.
  71. Enos Stone was born in Litchfield, CT and is thought to have come to Lenox as early as 1770.  He was a captain in the 12th Mass. Regiment in the Revolutionary War and was captured and imprisoned in Hubbardton, VT in January 1777. He had land in Brighton (now Rochester) NY, his son Enos Stone being one of the pioneers there.  He kept his residence in Lenox (on Stockbridge Street) until the spring of 1815 when he moved to Rochester and died there that year.  His daughter Mary married Deacon Gordon Hollister, Jr.
  72. Deacon John Stoughton, Jr.  (known as “Deacon” before coming to Lenox) came to Lenox about 1779 and moved to Troy, NY where he died. He owned a farm on Bourne Road and was magistrate in Lenox.
  73. Jonathan Taylor lived, in 1802, on the north line of Stockbridge (described in 1906 as south of Depot Road)..
  74. Abidjah Tomlin lived in Lee near the Lenox line near what is described in 1906 as below the Porter corner as well as Moses Way.
  75. Thomas Tracey* was first a member of the church at Pittsfield.  A soldier of the Revolution, he died of small pox contracted in the service and was buried at his farm in 1776.
  76. Timothy Treat lived in the northwest part of the town.
  77. Deacon James Wadsworth lived, at one time, in the village where Henry Sedgwick lived at the time of the Centennial celebration.
  78. William Walker was a Revolutionary war veteran, Judge of Probate in Berkshire County until he resigned in 1840 and his son William P. Walker assumed the post.  He was an investor in Lenox Furnace and other important commercial ventures.
  79. Moses Way (with Abner Way) sold 40 acres in the Hopkins Grant to Timothy Way* in 1786.
  80. Stephen Wells lived in the village.
  81. Deacon Stephen Wells, Jr. was a partner of Rudolphos Colton, a cabinet maker and lived in the village.
  82. Daniel West was a tanner who lived near the Congregational parsonage.
  83. Rev. Elisha Yale, D.D. was born in Lee in 1780 and joined the church October 20, 1799 He died in 1853 and was the pastor an Kingsborough, NY for more than 48 years.
  84. Thomas Yale came from Meriden, CT about 1778.

*signed the Non Importation Agreement

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